CryptoArt Sundays: Interview with SGT Slaughtermelon



Welcome to CryptoArt Sundays! I’m excited to introduce you to some super cool and obscure art this week by SGT Slaughtermelon. I have to say, usually this style of art is not my preference as I love more realistic type of art, but there is just something so wacky and catchy about these artworks that I feel I resonate with and that I had to share with you all.

As the artist themselves explains, SGT Slaughtermelon is a project in creating digital art with glitch aesthetics and wild collage techniques – sometimes using Processing scripts that are altered or coded from scratch – and almost always using some kind of geometric composition. The themes range from cyberpunk to mysticism, low-brow kitsch and absolute pretentious neo-suprematism.

Now let’s dive in and find out more about this incredible artist and the NFT vibe!

How did you find out about the NFT space, and what attracted you to create your own NFTs?

A total stranger that goes by Mr. Bones saw my Instagram feed and messaged me there. I was into it without knowing much of anything about it – and the concept of authentic digital art was really compelling to me as a digital artist.

How often do you create?

It depends on the week, but I generally try to make *something* new every week, whether it’s a new program for doing things or new raw materials or finished compositions or even a website reorganization. Creative work is what keeps me going.

What is your creative process?

“Process” would be a strong word, but generally I try to find an idea that I really enjoy playing with and then explore techniques for creating textures and patterns, try to balance that with the kinds of compositions I want to make and find a look that works for some new conceptual series.

Are there any CryptoArtists you would love to collaborate with?

So many that I couldn’t even list them all. One thing I’d like to do is be someone who connects other people to work together – try to facilitate success for other people in ways they couldn’t achieve just working on their own.

What do you think the future of CryptoArt will look like?

I think CryptoArt is really going to have to define itself in the public consciousness as a different category from NFT collectibles before the value proposition makes sense. It could be that we never really achieve that differentiation and CryptoArt ends up becoming just a weird small run version of collectibles whose future value is a dubious endeavor.

It could also be that the general public realizes that their use for digital art is significant, and that ownership of digital goods is a meaningful thing for the portion of our shared lives in digital spaces. The dream is that the realization that digital art has value sparks a new growth of the medium and digital art finds its voice as something other than capturing legacy formats.

What are you currently working on?

Currently, Glitch Forge is taking up most of my art time. It’s a novel generative/glitch platform on Tezos that launches this March. Otherwise – I’m splitting my art between three current series: desert_visions_of_st_turing / o_god_the_mail / 38_dimensional_chess.

Where can collectors find your work?

You pretty much have to look at my LinkTree. I like using OBJKT, Foundation, and Known Origin for most of my minting these days.

Want more? Connect with NFTeducation.org





*All investment/financial opinions expressed by NFTeducation.org are from the personal research and experience of our site moderators and are intended as educational material only. Individuals are required to fully research any product prior to making any kind of investment.





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